The First Horse Riders | Horse Domestication on the Eurasian Steppe

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Dan Davis History

Dan Davis History

Күн бұрын

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Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
NEW VIDEO ON 2021 HORSE DOMESTICATION STUDIES: Watch my video based on the latest research now: kzpost.info/ex/m7qqmrCmtGimotE/bejne Thanks for watching. If you enjoy this video you will like my other videos on history and prehistory so check them out here: People of the Bronze Age Playlist: kzpost.info/camera/PLUyGT3KDxwC8u4jG_tOjN-8-bsHxucUxn Bronze Age Warfare Playlist: kzpost.info/camera/PLUyGT3KDxwC8xD2S2Q1IqH_S_ocWwXWHv Medieval History Playlist: kzpost.info/camera/PLUyGT3KDxwC_Jh59Fp5aU5Fzj0oUXUkEJ
Michel Bleau
Michel Bleau Ай бұрын
I learn riding with native knowledge, no saddle, no bar, rein, or other accessories, confidence & trust is the main asset. Your feet do the guiding, you can control the horse even with your hands tied in the back & mouth covered.
Arnau Basulto
Arnau Basulto 2 ай бұрын
Have you thought about doig a similar video but with donkeys?
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses 6 ай бұрын
@Sejfudin Halarewicz and what origin color horses ? Bay dun ?
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses 6 ай бұрын
@Sejfudin Halarewicz sorry to bother you, but I am very interested in horses, what did the horses look like before domestication ? Was it like the tarpan or the Arabian horse ? (Look like)
Nil Kumar Thapa
Nil Kumar Thapa 9 ай бұрын
Llpplppppppppppppppppppppp
John Shook
John Shook Жыл бұрын
I think the “experts” might not have enough experience with horses. Riding without saddle & bit is not an impossibility. Doing so with skill & speed is something I’ve witnessed children do. Certainly, growing up with your foal and learning young creates a friendship between rider & horse. This bond is mutually affectionate. In that circumstance, the rider using legs only to control their horse while using weapons is easy enough. Of course no evidence of that is likely to be found
B E O W U L F
B E O W U L F 5 күн бұрын
The first time I rode a horse, it was bareback, without any reigns. At first I was led around on it by the girls who owned it, and then after I showed confidence and competence, I was allowed to ride it all by myself. Again, no saddle, no reigns, completely unsupervised, and I was about 8 or 9 years old at the time. If I was able to do that, the very first time I rode a horse, then I'm certain that the people who domesticated horses, and lived their whole lives alongside them, would have been able to ride them without any issues.
Eddie McMullan
Eddie McMullan 21 күн бұрын
As a kid my brother and I use to ride all of the time with out a saddle. We used a hay string across the nose as a bridle . To stop him in a hurry,we would reach a cross his nose and pull him back or close his wind off at his nostrils. We weight less than 100 pounds at best and the horse, Old Charlie weight well over 1,000 pounds,and was over 15 hands high. Loved every moment of it. We learned that size does not matter. Equipment isn't required. But smart tuff little country boys can do anything that they wanted to.
MrFlamants
MrFlamants Ай бұрын
@Real Aiglon ? What do you mean?
Real Aiglon
Real Aiglon Ай бұрын
*One space between sentences is plenty enough. Are you typing on an old typewriter? I don't think so.*
MrFlamants
MrFlamants Ай бұрын
From the Berber, a tribute from North Africa, we know in 2000 bc, that they where good bare back riders with both legs on one side. No bridle, just a stick. They lived with their horses in harmony, half humans half guardians. The first Campinos, Vaqueros and Gardians. They had a deep knowledge of the instincts of horses and great respect. Compulsion and punishment where excluded. The beginning of Horsemanship...
Peleg Wadsworth
Peleg Wadsworth Жыл бұрын
I think it is a mistake, to assume that the bit is the only way to control a horse. Spanish riding traditional uses what is called a hackamore. A woven strip of rawhide encircles the horses muzzle. Pressure on the muzzle, controls the horse. In modern times, the people of Mongolia ride horses very similar to ancient horses. Very short, and very stocky. The argument that short and stocky horses would not be an advantage, is somewhat ridiculous. Training a wild horse, without the use of a previously trained horse, is nigh impossible. However, if a young foal were captured, after the killing of its mother, it would be quite easy to train that horse. Very much in the same way that wolf puppies we're probably trained, to be domestic companions. I think that modern archaeologists have a tendency to belittle the abilities of ancient peoples. It is important to remember that they were every bit as smart as we are. To say that early peoples were not capable of doing what we do all the time, shows a tremendous amount of hubris. If they were eating horses, they had access to foals. If they had access to foals, then they had access to rideable mounts. Personally, I believe that domestication occurred very early. However, archaeological proof of such domestication would be unlikely to survive. This is why we have not found walrus skin boots, from ancient times. But that's another topic, entirely. Enjoyed the video. Keep it up
Sandra Lewis
Sandra Lewis 8 күн бұрын
@Peter Ruby I think you are right about girls being the first horse tamers. There was a theory I read about many decades ago about the maternal instinct to nurture baby animals and form relationships, much the way human infants are socialized. Wolf puppies, baby birds, piglets, lambs, kids, and more. I've seen pictures of native women in less modern cultures breastfeeding animals like a prized lamb or calf, alongside a human child. It's worth a google search to get more information.
NavvyMom
NavvyMom 2 ай бұрын
@pugilist102 Is everybody who speculates that early horses could not support the weight of a rider remembering that earlier humans were smaller also?
pAraSamGatE
pAraSamGatE 10 ай бұрын
@william Thomas Very astute comment.
pAraSamGatE
pAraSamGatE 10 ай бұрын
@Peter Ruby I thought so too. 👍
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses
عالم الخيول 🐎 world horses Жыл бұрын
Does this mean that horses before domestication were weak and could not carry humans on their back ??? !!!!
Evbb Jones
Evbb Jones Жыл бұрын
I grew up on a farm, and had the whole list of animals. My siblings and I attempted to ride literally every one of them that looked like it could support our weight. Pigs, goats, cows, even the neighbors llama. Granted we also had horses, so there's a strong chance that knowing riding might be a possibility inspired us to attempt it in the first place. I can't help but feel early man did the same thing. :D I agree with many people in this comments section pointing out that horses were likely taken in at very young ages, likely after the death of the parental guardian. They were raised in environments where they never developed, or quickly conquered their fear of man. Even today, you can find examples of this all over the world in the most unlikely places: Pet lions and tigers, bears, chimpanzee's, the list is extremely long. And with that I have to echo what I said above. Those early humans definitely looked at those horses that they could now interact with and thought, 'I wonder if I can ride that thing'. They likely took turns, and it likely turned into sport, and I'm sure they quickly thought up ways to improve the experience. This attitude, this behavior, is what it IS to be human in large part: Curious tool users. Great video, really enjoyed!
Aramis One
Aramis One 3 ай бұрын
A tame Animal and a domasticated are two different things , domesticated animals like dogs were bred so their wild genes changed for example people pick the least aggressive dogs and let them mate and then the same is done for a couple generations and then they are domesticated .
Dex Terrr
Dex Terrr 3 ай бұрын
People of step herders used to be a very good runners i suppose. They herd their cattles, sheep by foot then they started to be curious about horses use some ropes to catch them like cowboys (we mongolians use "uurga" very long wooden stick with ropes attached to the end) then wrestle them down to hop on their back. You can see a mongolian literally wrestles down a wild and horse then starts to ride
Old  Man
Old Man Жыл бұрын
It had to be some teenagers daring each other to try to ride it to show off for some girls .
Alexander
Alexander Жыл бұрын
It's possible children ride dogs, pigs etc because they have seen people riding horses, though. It might be a spark that needs to kick in for humans to start imagening riding other animals etc. But like, most likely they started out as carriers and a domesticated food source, nomadic tribes must have realised that they could carry heavy weights on sleads or on their back, and possibly even children, who got tired of walking and started crying and pregnant women etc while being lead by another member of the tribe and eventually they realised they could ride them.
Fair Enough
Fair Enough Жыл бұрын
As well, I am sure the ancients would have seen birds or small animals climb on the backs of a horse laying down. It just isn't a far stretch to think that a person then would approach a subservient mare laying down and try to get on it's back. I am also in agreement with the idea of children connecting with foals and establishing a bond leading to riding the horse.
K T
K T Жыл бұрын
When I lived in New Zealand we would come across wild horses around a place called Waiouru, quite magnificent to see them running free, I have a Hungarian horse bow but alas as close as I've come to a wild horse in the UK was a Tesco's lasagna. 😬
signoguns
signoguns 4 ай бұрын
I used to really like those Tesco lasagnes :(
THE CHIEF WILDHORSE
THE CHIEF WILDHORSE 5 ай бұрын
@Dan Davis History So did the Spanish just go around unloading horses everywhere??? Or where the continents connected at one point and everyone just regurgitates what they learned from other people who regurgitated the same information before them??? -COMANCHE NATION
Darren Turell
Darren Turell 9 ай бұрын
@Dan Davis History cty
Free-lance human being
Free-lance human being 11 ай бұрын
@Dominic M no they don’t. Wild =/= Feral
Devine Rentals LTD
Devine Rentals LTD Жыл бұрын
@K T Moose last photographed in South Island around 1950. The hunters who took the photo agreed not to show it until one of them passed away in case anyone wanted to shoot them with more than a camera so only came out about 10-15 years back when one of them died.
Bertelli Justin
Bertelli Justin Жыл бұрын
I wonder if anyone has tried tracing the centaur myths to their origins. I always imagined they were the result of the first mounted warriors attacking a village or people that hadn’t seen horses before or at least never seen someone ride one. “Man they came out of no where big 4 legged animals with human torsos attached to them and just started killing us!!”
Kitti McConnell
Kitti McConnell 2 ай бұрын
Yes, there was apparently a challenge in Mycenea for young men to leap over the backs of bulls. That would be a dangerous and unwise thing to do, just what teenage boys love best. It seems that garbled tales of this challenge somehow turned into the minotaur myth.
Elizabeth Anne Grey
Elizabeth Anne Grey 3 ай бұрын
Brilliant comment.
C
C Жыл бұрын
@Józef Kozon Yes, I also heard somewhere that the myth of the centaur could have been derived from tales of the Scythians.
somniumisdreaming
somniumisdreaming Жыл бұрын
Yes whole papers have been written on it.
Józef Kozon
Józef Kozon Жыл бұрын
Well, it was likely made by tales of people that stambled upon Kimmerians or scytchians before big greak colonization.
Suzanne Terrey
Suzanne Terrey Жыл бұрын
As a rider of dressage, I can readily see where riding a horse bareback without saddle or bridle would be extremely easy given time to adjust the body to relax and give "signals" through the seat bones and legs. I often rode my horse without saddle or bridle and found that by turning my torso, moving my legs back or forward, would cause my horse to turn or stop depending on pressure of my upper thigh or lower leg. Even turning my shoulders would cause change of direction. All is dependent on the rider's relaxation or minute tension, and going with the horses movement. I suspect early man would have wanted to move with the speed of a running horse at some time or another and would have eventually tried to get on the back of a horse just to go fast. I suspect all this happened much earlier than scientists believe as the curiosity of the human is far stronger than most believe.
jfv65
jfv65 Жыл бұрын
early man? Why not early KIDS?! imagine a Proto-Indo-European kid from the steppe people herding some horses owned by his family or tribe. The kid gets curious (like all kids do!) and tries to mount an older mare that is already very familiar with the kid. The mare is not spooked by the little kid and accepts him mounting... the kid rides the mare and discovers how the mare can be controlled. The kid teaches the other kids in his tribe the same trick. Pretty soon 10-20-100 kids are riding horses! (just like modern kids learn to ride skateboards!) Those kids grow up while all the time riding horses and honing their riding skills. At some point they are teen or adolescent horse riders. One of them discovers he can actually SHOOT his bow and arrow effectively while riding! Pretty soon all tribesmen will do that. The rest is history.
frederic rike
frederic rike Жыл бұрын
@Sheepdog9 The Spanish Conquistadors were entering the Central Americas as early as 1525 or so- I'd need a trip to the library or a while beating up my Wiki button to be sure. I did not say the American Indians were the first riders- only that until they saw the Spanish riders they had seen horses as a food source, not a source of transportation. FR
Sheepdog9
Sheepdog9 Жыл бұрын
@frederic rike ...what century?
Achik
Achik Жыл бұрын
The Assyrians were the first to use and invented the saddle
Mikio Hirata
Mikio Hirata Жыл бұрын
Yes thousand years earlier in the high steps of Central Asia on those small short horses. kids grow up with herds and naturally bond with and rode them without any equipment.
phil paine
phil paine Жыл бұрын
I think that the role of children in the development of riding has been ignored. If captured ponies were being used as pack animals or to pull travois, it would not be long before they were used to carry small children, in the same way that burros and asses are commonly used. Everywhere in agricultural societies, you see children astride a variety of domesticated animals (my Philipino nephew was riding water buffalo practically from birth). I suspect that this practice familiarized the horse with the human and the human with the horse in such a way that older and older children remained on the horses until they began to direct them autonomously, rather than just being carried as baggage.
David Halenda
David Halenda 10 ай бұрын
Really good pt. Maybe they started with dogs!
Eleanor Finley
Eleanor Finley Жыл бұрын
This
Zakariah Johnson
Zakariah Johnson Жыл бұрын
I think you're on to something here.
jeanne griffin
jeanne griffin Жыл бұрын
@mondopinion Yeah, kids nowadays have no idea the freedoms they have lost (where I live).
CLASSICALFAN .100
CLASSICALFAN .100 Жыл бұрын
Almost all children grew up on farms in the old days, and their parents gave them tasks to do in order to "earn their keep". On Market Day, one of these tasks was to hitch a pony to a small cart which was loaded down with apples (a VERY important job for a child!). As they began their trip to market, the child would get this stern warning: **DON'T UPSET THE APPLE CART**!!
Kevin RAAAMAGE
Kevin RAAAMAGE Жыл бұрын
I ride bareback and without a bit all the time, you don't control a horse with a bit, you control them with their nose. Its not impossible to ride without. Maybe for someone who doesn't know horses. I also ride a dominant mare, the head mares are worth their weight in gold, she was search and rescue. Bought her for about 500$ and learned to ride on a dominant male gelding, and gentled the ex stud in my profile pic. I have some quams with the experts, I actually went to school for equine studies, and have lots of yeses and nos. I recommend looking up mustang makeover contestants if you really wanna learn about the wild ones. Bits also predate the wheel, riding did come first, I remember that test question in My equine history class very well. It was stirrups that were the HUGE game changer. Mongolia and Kahastekstan were the first to domesticate and did it around the same time. Many native tribes in rhe US favored mares for their overprotectiveness and willingness to defend their riders. Mares, and horses in general will lay down their life for you. Mules and donkeys, to the 11th degree. Even though we originally domesticated for food, they're mankind's most underrated and misunderstood MVP. Horses originated in North America, migrated, and died off, but continued to live everywhere else
dkeith45
dkeith45 Жыл бұрын
@Kevin RAAAMAGE 'you control them with their nose'. Exactly. Which is why I eventually went to the 'bitless bosal'. Controlling their head is important and having a solid relationship with them is even more important. Metal in their mouth is barbaric and not necessary.
Melissa Montilla
Melissa Montilla Жыл бұрын
@Leona Bastet my horse has gone after dogs, a snake, other horses and even an asshole of a Ferrier protecting my daughter and I. Like people they have different personalities. ☺️
Yarbloco
Yarbloco Жыл бұрын
@Leona Bastet yeah I worked with horses for a couple months and I was surprised how fearful they are. This one time we were riding slowly and one of the mares got scared of a few sheep that were lying there under a tree. All 5 horses got scared and run away for a second before forced to stop. Sure, wild horses wouldn't be as frightful, and they can be trained to remain calmed at pretty much any circumnstance, but that does take a lot of continuous work.
Andrew Love
Andrew Love Жыл бұрын
@Linda first people to "see horses" were erectus or at least neanderthal and denisovan. Mongolians are east Asians who colonized Siberia and central asia much much later. Same east asian colonization of Siberia is what created "first nation" people. Who are 70% east asian.
Yarbloco
Yarbloco Жыл бұрын
@Linda the Mongolians? really? Not even proto-Mongols, PIEs or Scythians? If we're only talking about 'seeing' horses, well, the Denisovans coexisted with some proto-horses about 24,000 years ago. I don't think the Mongolians can top that ;P siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/n0877-remains-of-extinct-zebra-like-horse-found-at-denisova-cave-home-of-ancient-man/ I guess Denisovans aren't technically 'humans', but still, plenty of ancient humans before the Mongolians. It's probably impossible to know which hominid saw horses for the first time. Horses might have gotten to the Americas through Siberia to Alaska but that doesn't mean they weren't roaming the rest of Eurasia long before that. Horses and hominids could've met for the first time pretty much anywhere in Eurasia.
T
T Жыл бұрын
I think a good piece of evidence for the early riding hypothesis is the high value placed on horses by Yamnaya (and descendant peoples) who were mainly eating sheep and cows. They were burying people with horse skulls and hides, had horse head shaped maces, and horse inscribed stones. Also the horse was very important ritually to the indo european peoples, with a common ritual significance shared by peoples whose ancestry split before the late horse riding hypothesis is dated to.
Ghostrider B.
Ghostrider B. Ай бұрын
Actually it was the botai culture not the yamnaya and they were speaking uralic language. You can find the article on the pubmed by searching keywords.
David Peloquin
David Peloquin Жыл бұрын
I was wondering about that. I can buy that maybe the spread of the Proto-Indo-Europeans was due to the mastery of cart/chariot technology rather than horseback riding, but it really surprised me to hear that there was nothing before the first millennium BC (not even in the Vedas?) that suggested a more intimate/"bums on backs" relationship between Indo-Europeans and the horses that seemed to be pretty important to them judging by the texts and legends that have come down to us and our ability to identify so many horse-related words of Proto-Indo-European by tracing existing cognates of later and even modern Indo-European languages back to common roots...
Leslee G
Leslee G Жыл бұрын
The detail on horse domestication in the Horse, the Wheel and Language was one of the best parts of the book.Domestication of the horse was the central most important basis for spurring the economy of the steppe people, from what I have read in this and other sources. I think it's what makes the steppe cultures so very fascinating. They were such innovators and this one thing changed the course of all of future civilizations. It's vital to the history of human civilization, so you need to devote enough time to sufficiently explore it.
Józef Kozon
Józef Kozon Жыл бұрын
Theay got Iron first. In X ce. BC.
Rumors of WAAAGH
Rumors of WAAAGH Жыл бұрын
I wouldn't be surprised if the first person to mount a horse, was a kid who mounted up on the back of their pet, because they didn't know any better. The horse trusted the owner, and the kid didn't weight too much to cause the animal pain and discomfort.
NaCl Apex
NaCl Apex 18 күн бұрын
I didn't ride horses, however as a little kid of around 5-6 years old, my aunt used to get mad at me because I kept trying to mount/ride on the back of their dog hehe. (Which they dont have the frame for so my aunt was right to pull me off) But yeah it was natural child curiosity. So I wouldn't be surprised if children back in those days tried to ride goats, cattle, horses, anything really. Just out of playful nature.
Ca Se
Ca Se Ай бұрын
All very possible. It's what I imagined. Fortunately, horses are strong and can handle the weight of a man without pain-- (injuries or other issues aside)...
TigerWoodsLibido
TigerWoodsLibido 3 ай бұрын
And languages change when kids with lisps become powerful people.
Miranda Goldstine
Miranda Goldstine Жыл бұрын
Me neither. I can imagine a Neolithic era kid happily riding a horse with their faithful canine companion at their side. A pretty sweet and adorable image if I may say so myself.
Józef Kozon
Józef Kozon Жыл бұрын
When i was 7, i liked to mount, by waiting for the horse to eat grass, and then by sitting by her ears to be lifted, when she noticed my shenanigans.
Charlie Swearingen
Charlie Swearingen Жыл бұрын
Very interesting subject. I have ridden horses all my life and earned my living on horseback. Based on my experience I'm inclined to think horses were used mainly for transportation and mobility rather than the actual battle. Beyond creating chaos during a cavalry charge shooting firearms or arrows from horseback on a very excited galloping horse can not be very accurate or effective as a whole. I know because as a young hotheaded male I have shot at wild game from the saddle with both pistol and rifle. I was successful at times but it was not very effective and there are better ways to use a firearm than from horseback. Just the horse's breathing alone is enough to throw off your marksmanship. I believe it was more customary to use horses for speed and mobility to quickly gain advantageous positions with the use of horses or to get down off their mounts for both setting up defensive or assault positions. About the only weaponry, I see useful in a cavalry charge would be lances and sabers and so I believe the predominant military use of horses was for the transport of equipment supplies and mobility rather than battle. Custer dismounted his troops during his last stand battle in an effort to enhance their effectiveness. They even destroyed their mounts and used them for defensive breastworks...
Louise Dolloff
Louise Dolloff Жыл бұрын
Many of the native peoples here in North America who captured and used the feral horses that escaped from the Spanish, trained and rode them without bits and bridles. They used a leather thong with a loop in the end that was placed in the horse's mouth for steering and control. Other leather straps were braided into the horse's mane for a handhold, and a simple pad and strap were used for a saddle. The person riding the horse invested a lot of time and effort into training it to work with the rider, just like people do today. Different methods, similar results. There's no reason why the ancient steppe people didn't do the same thing. The leathers would leave it no trace being organic, and it was more than likely only some people were of a mind to try the idea out... There's always one guy or gal who says "I wonder what would happen if..." So, I am of the mind that horse taming and riding was early, but the idea didn't exactly spread like wildfire until later
stsk
stsk Жыл бұрын
That was already accounted for by Anthony. They trained horses using leather and hemp bits; their findings suggest that they too would leave marks on horses' teeth.
newtype0083
newtype0083 Жыл бұрын
The "chariot first" theory for warfare makes more sense to me. Trying to fight and control a large animal by yourself seems daunting. Having someone else drive leaves you free to shoot and throw. It is also a much shorter leap from wagons to chariots, than wagons to riding.
Leon Kharkongor
Leon Kharkongor Жыл бұрын
You can ride a cow. Wagons were pulled by cows. Cow herders were riding cows at the same time they were herding cows long before the wagon. Chariots were just status symbols. I don't think they fought on horseback but rather horses were used to transport warriors to or near battlefields or places they were going to raid
Carel Goodheir
Carel Goodheir Жыл бұрын
@Rara Avis They won't have the same social structure as horses and I'm guessing that they aren't as programed to follow and obey a lead mare as horses are. There's a difference between African and Indian elephants too in terms of domesticatability; the Afrikan ones have at times been domesticated but proved much more dangerous and liable to turn on the mahout.
Carel Goodheir
Carel Goodheir Жыл бұрын
@mosquitobight I think that is just how it would have happened.
Bob Vick
Bob Vick Жыл бұрын
@Jack O'Neill Yes humans & horses interacted well before the wheel was invented. Most do not realize that a baby horse will respond to humans much like a dog, loving to be rubbed & scratched. Well my ancestors ride Reindeer & might drag an A frame like the American Indians did, but no wheels in Siberia.
Jack O'Neill
Jack O'Neill Жыл бұрын
I consider this an obvious mistake. For chariot first to be the least bit plausible, you must suppose that the entire time line of human interactions with the horse leading up to the chariot, IN ALL INTANCES, occurred with no one mounting a horse. Also you proceed from a much more complex technology to a technology as simple as a rope. I've have the same objection to the concept of the bow leading to the use of stringed instruments. A single string, in tension, can produce tone, and must have been made use of for this purpose long before the bow and arrow.
andrew strongman
andrew strongman Жыл бұрын
I lean towards the hypothesis that the first domesticated horses were used as pack animals, or for hauling sleds and later, carts. Horses at that time were too small to carry an adult human, and increasing their size took centuries of breeding. Evidence for this argument is that battle-carts and chariots ruled Mesopotamia and Egypt for centuries. They were used as mobile platforms for archers. They could not have dominated warfare for so long if horse-archers existed.
andrew strongman
andrew strongman 8 ай бұрын
@Indra muhammad No, horses were introduced into those regions long after the first civilisations formed. Horses were endemic on the plains and steppes much further North and East, and were an important food source for nomadic hunters. The first people to domesticate horses were of the Botai culture, in the area around Kazakhstan. The domestication of horses began by using captured animals as draft-horses and for milk. The invention of the wheel was the deciding factor in the spread of horses. Mesopotamians first used oxen or asses to haul 'battle-carts', but by 2,500 BCE they had adopted horses and chariots soon followed.
Indra muhammad
Indra muhammad 8 ай бұрын
So the first to tame horses were the mespotamians and egyptians
Joyce Wasser
Joyce Wasser Жыл бұрын
They were not too small to carry adult humans. Look how stocky they are. A Shetland pony can carry a man!
Downhomesunset
Downhomesunset Жыл бұрын
Adult humans at that time were much smaller too. The full ability to ride needed the invention of stirrups-which I believe the Mongols achieved.
Sean Poore
Sean Poore Жыл бұрын
Also, especially since you mentioned the Comanche, early horse warriors could have used horses to transport themselves to the site of battle, dismount to fight, then remount and ride away, rather than fighting from the saddle like you see in later cavalry developments. The Comanche used horses in this way on their infamous raids rather than fight from the saddle, and this is possibly how horses were used early on
TigerWoodsLibido
TigerWoodsLibido 3 ай бұрын
Their horses were brought from Europe…Y chromosome haplogroup R1 essentially conquered the earth with that innovation.
Joe RoganJosh
Joe RoganJosh Жыл бұрын
The early English/Anglo Saxons rode to battle but fought on foot, while their contemporaries in mainland Europe (hint: the Normans) were accomplished cavalry soldiers.
Sean Poore
Sean Poore Жыл бұрын
@OnTheRoadWithTEX that's a good point too lol it probably involved a few hundred years of teenage boys challenging eachother to see who could stay on the bucking horses back for the longest rodeo style
Sean Poore
Sean Poore Жыл бұрын
@Sandra Kleinschmit no worries lol we're good 👍
OnTheRoadWithTEX
OnTheRoadWithTEX Жыл бұрын
@Sean Poore Certainly, there was considerable variation in how different tribes used horses, such that some were exceptionally noted for it (Comanches and Apaches especially, but most of the plains Indians once they had the horse), and some hardly used them at all. As to the base question raised by the video, I have difficulty believing that once people had the wheel--from about 5,500 years ago--they wouldn't have used strong animals to pull carts. My belief is that it's a natural impulse to ride any animal available that's big enough to carry the weight. Also factoring into consideration is that there are people who have an uncanny affinity for training horses, and there are some horses that show an exceptional affinity for contact with humans. These phenomena would facilitate humans using horses for whatever was beneficial, including the use that's most fun--riding them. It seems the element of fun was overlooked by academics. But it's more than just fun, really; as Winston Churchill put it "There's nothing so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse."
Cass
Cass Жыл бұрын
A day out for boys - young teen - in my home town was to catch some wild ponies on the hills and ride them down the beach, no saddle or bridle. Love this video for its thorough and consciencious approach. Too much obsession with war - sport is far more common in human life.
Survive the Jive
Survive the Jive Жыл бұрын
If Botai horses were not domesticated then we need not assume Przewalski's horses were ever domesticated since they descend from Botai horses. The big DNA paper looking at steppe horse DNA has been in the pipeline since 2018 and still isn't published but when it is out we will know for sure whether modern horse breeds descend from WSH horses and that will be very telling in regards to who domesticated them. As for mounted warfare - i don't believe WSH used horses in battle either. I think they would be perfect for scouting and also as symbols of power to intimidate enemies though.
Seyf Klc
Seyf Klc 6 ай бұрын
@oduffy1936 bru you mean Arian because ayran is the turc word for a yogurt drink
NeuKrofta
NeuKrofta 9 ай бұрын
You don't need to be mounted to use horses in battle, chariots being the perfect example. Also, if they were mounted, going to war as mounted archers is perfectly viable.
BandAid350z
BandAid350z 11 ай бұрын
Needing to feed more children, or a single child or two during hard times would entice many parents to try milk from other animals. If successful any parent would continue the practice. If a tribe wanted to bolster its population growth, it would surely look for ways to do so. Cultivating aurochs, early horses, goats, and sheep would certainly all be viable. And any parent that has a toddler with an affinity for milk would surely know that milk can go bad from time to time. Hard times? Eh, try and drink it. Gives you a funny drunk feeling? Great. Harsh environments breeds ingenuity, creativity, and courageousness. Being the man that saves your tribe from a harsh winter by rounding up some horses to feed the children and get the elders drunk? Legendary status. Be the wild boy who hops on a horse as a stunt and continues to ride it, same status. It’s not so hard to fathom.
Allotment Fox
Allotment Fox 11 ай бұрын
@Rune Dyrting Carefully
Elize Cloete
Elize Cloete Жыл бұрын
@MassTV Lactose is a sugar which is converted during fermentation and thus the end product becomes digestible to lactose-intolerant people.
Halle Strausser
Halle Strausser Жыл бұрын
Two points from an actual modern horseperson. Early riding was likely tackless. Or done with just halters. It’s easy and actually easier to get a horse to accept. Horse do not move like sheep and cattle and do not respond well to such methods. They bolt when scared and will run themselves through anything and to their death. That’s why we have cattle dogs and sheep dog but no horse dogs.
Luke McCampbell
Luke McCampbell Жыл бұрын
I feel like these academics have never actually rode on a horse. That should be a requirement in order to fully understand what they are theorizing.
nobody
nobody Жыл бұрын
@Dan Davis History everyone here is correct, especially you. However, just because Xenophon and his folks couldn't shoot an arrow well without stirrups doesn't mean others couldn't. In fact, that seems like a great way to underestimate your enemy to me! Conversely, just because one or several groups figured out the art doesn't mean they couldn't still have been entirely wiped from the planet by a stronger force, or by some sort of illness in either the humans or the horses. Strangles, a highly contagious and fatal respiratory infection can kill great swaths and even entire herds of horses in mere days, which would have left their humans suddenly with no transportation, and likely convinced that their gods had turned against them. If they were on the tundra or in enemy territory when that happened, there simply wouldn't be any record of anything. Personally, I'm absolutely positive that people have been riding horses longer than it's possible to find evidence of. Unless something comes out of a glacier, I suppose. How incredible would that be!? I think that sitting on the back of a horse happened 'for the first time' in many different places, probably by tired herding boys. I'm sure lots of people also had the epiphany to put their backpack or toddler on a horse, but that doesn't mean that anyone took the next step of intentionally harnessing that power and putting it to work, had the ability to support a group of working horses, or were even in a position to use horse power. I often wonder if the earliest domesticated horses were considered sacred, or revered as the main provider of everything, like cattle in many places today. It might have been taboo to do something as crude as sitting on them or putting them to work. Even after it was common place to ride them for more than just fun and have them carry loads or pull a travois though, I think it would have been quite a while (thousands of years) before anyone had both the resources and need to use horses in battle. At a minimum, that would require a fairly large scale of agriculture and a decent sized group of people doing nothing but caring for and training the war horses. And, of course, horses that aren't needed for anything else that horses are commonly used for. Only so many landscapes will even allow for mounted battles or horses in general. They require a large open area with few bushes, trees, rocks or uneven terrain, that also has access to a large amount of fresh water. Horses are pretty useless in forests and mountainous areas, and there is very little food for them in those areas. There's a reason the Spanish didn't use their horses very long in South America. Horses are expensive and high maintenance, and at most they'll have one offspring per year. It's then two to three years before they are big enough and have had time to be trained well enough to be ridden, much less trained well enough to be more useful than dangerous in the turmoil of a battle. Even modern horses instinctually run from any kind of noise or hubbub. Getting them to run towards a fight is not nearly as easy as it might seem. A horse trained for battle is expensive in any time period. Really expensive. Ask a mounted policeman some time. Horses die in battle, and even while hunting. Quite aside from being wounded by the enemy, horses are easily wounded in general. Even running across an open field is dangerous. One gopher hole, unseen rock or just a bad step can twist or break a leg. Even today, a broken leg is a death sentence for a horse, and I imagine that a sprain could be just as bad for nomads. While a single mounted rider in battle would be quite an advantage, I just can't believe that very many humans could watch other humans ride into battle (or anywhere else) without trying their damned to do it themselves. Our species is nothing if not competitive, especially the ones with high levels of testosterone. Think about this part, too- if you take your only battle trained horse to actual battles, you're not going to have a battle trained horse for long. Even if it's only wounded and not dead, it'll be a while before it can be ridden again. You'll need at least one backup horse, and a few in training. You'll also need to have younger horses continually being born and raised to keep supply up, unless you are rich enough to buy them already trained. And that's for each warrior. A person with a large herd of horses is rich, even by today's standards. Any group with a herd large enough to risk a few of them with any regularity would be phenomenally rich in a strictly hunter gatherer society. Nothing short of a large territory with many people working towards the same goal would be able to raise, care for, and train a large group of horses ~just~ to send them to battle. It took entire tribes of indigenous people growing grain and herding in north america to manage the herds aquired from the Spanish. There's a reason that horses are still called the sport of kings. I'm not sure if even large groups of hunter gatherers would be able to continually collect the amount of resources needed to raise and support a group of trained battle horses. Even just feeding them would most likely require either agriculture or (but most likely and) continual migration to the perfect forage, like the eurasian stepps or north american plains. Like humans, horses need to take in as many calories as they use. At a certain amount of physical effort, even the best grass isn't enough. If grass is all the horses are eating, they're only going to be able to do so much exercise before they drop dead. Also, dried grass doesn't have a lot of calories, so if it's the horses' only intake, they will necessarily spend most of their awake time grazing. They aren't going to last very long if they are so hungry they aren't sleeping, either. Training a horse to riding or driving takes a lot of time, repetition and physical effort by both horse and human, and that's just the veryest basics like 'please don't buck me off'. Realistically, it would be impossible to train a horse well enough for battle or even extensive riding, driving or packing without providing extra fodder and grain for them, especially in the winter. I've got so much more to babble about, but I'm out of time!
Carel Goodheir
Carel Goodheir Жыл бұрын
@Austin Oltjenbruns A link to info on the 20000 year ago horse riders? I can't believe it. There is so much evidence for the dating Dan Davis gives that I think we can take that as settled.
mpetersen6
mpetersen6 Жыл бұрын
@Dan Davis History In regards to riding or as a beast of burden what came first? From the beast of burden being led on a halter it would be a short step to riding. Or was it the other way around.
mpetersen6
mpetersen6 Жыл бұрын
@Austin Oltjenbruns Source please. I'm just interested.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
@Austin Oltjenbruns where are these 20k year old paintings of horse riders?
Saucy Wench
Saucy Wench Жыл бұрын
I'd say that once horses started being domesticated for food that's when the riding began. It's a natural progression of human thought. Human wants to sit on rock, stone or log as opposed to ground. Here's a seemingly docile animal right next to me about hip height, I'll indulge my curiosity or your dare and see what happens if I do this.
Saucy Wench
Saucy Wench Жыл бұрын
@CLASSICALFAN .100 I can't bring myself to clear this comment, it's just too funny!
Saucy Wench
Saucy Wench Жыл бұрын
@CLASSICALFAN .100 Lmao!
CLASSICALFAN .100
CLASSICALFAN .100 Жыл бұрын
But, in the Orient, did prehistoric people **SIT ON A WOK**?...(ROFL)
Saucy Wench
Saucy Wench Жыл бұрын
@Zeno Lachance The horses referred to in this video and that I am referring to are pony sized or not much bigger than. You're speaking of modern horses, this video is not.
Zeno Lachance
Zeno Lachance Жыл бұрын
About hip height? I had to climb in a tree to get on my horse bareback... I was only about four foot ten when I was 13
OnTheRoadWithTEX
OnTheRoadWithTEX Жыл бұрын
As a child, I rode horses bareback and used my knees and the horses' manes to transmit commands. I often use a halter instead of a bridle. I have seen people giving commands to horses with their feet while standing up on them and also using clucking sounds. A wild horse can be trained for basic riding in less than a month. Surely modern horses, even wild ones, probably have traits selected over time by humans that makes training easier. I suspect, however, that those traits were always there in some horses. While I doubted it until I saw it, there is the phenomenon of the horse whisperer. I wonder how that could have played into the domestication of horses to allow riding them. There's something special between some people and some horses.
OnTheRoadWithTEX
OnTheRoadWithTEX Жыл бұрын
@Maggie The Druid I'll bet you don't wear spurs, either. I haven't used them since I was about 12. Really, with a trained horse spurs aren't necessary, and I wouldn't use them today at any point in a horse's training.
Maggie The Druid
Maggie The Druid Жыл бұрын
I've never used more than a halter or rope around the horses neck
Israel Tovar
Israel Tovar 10 ай бұрын
Anthony also argues that fighting from horseback was unlikely, lacking the bow technology of the reflex composite bow. The argument was that they rode to the surroundings of the target, dismount, raid, and then retreat to the horses, remount and ride away...
vijay kumar
vijay kumar Ай бұрын
Great video. I have watched many more videos from Dan and it always feels like we are all connected across national boundaries and celebrating human history. One perception that gets created though after watching these videos is that these ancients in Steppe were "violent with no empathy and caused genocide whenever they interacted with settled cultures". Somehow it sounds very one-dimensional and doesn't seem right. Have you also felt the same? Kindly share your thoughts below. Here is another scenario that could have played out - As these ancient Indo Europeans migrated into more fertile distant lands where agriculture was possible, there were initially violent interactions but slowly they permanently settled down there. The local cultures might have also willingly adopted many elements of Indo European language, technology and way of life. The local women might have preferred to marry Indo Europeans as well and this is not as bizarre as it sounds (Natural selection?). Indo Europeans in return learnt farming and other cultural elements of a settled life. Possible? How many generations does it take for this to happen? Is it 5-10 range, or >25? I would pick 5-10 (100-200 years), and this is also probably within error limits of carbon dating techniques that are used. This would look "abrupt"/"too small" to an archaeologist who is dealing with a timeline of 1000s of years and may perceive this "natural selection" process as "genocide"? Also, there was mention of trade taking place between other settled cultures and these Indo Europeans. What's the need for trade if a local culture can be "completely dominated violently" and everything be taken away by force? Also, maybe this much violence was a norm at that time when 2 cultures interacted with each other first time or were at war? This is also talked about at length in books such as "Sapiens" and "The Third Chimpanzee". I think its very convenient to bucketize ("stereotype"?) people as "too violent" or "too peaceful". Hollywood fantasies also loves doing this. However reality is not black and white and there could be many more shades of grey in between.
Xinfamousqx
Xinfamousqx Жыл бұрын
Love horses and how they played a role in our history. RIP to all the horses that died in battle
Stanley Shannon
Stanley Shannon Жыл бұрын
I never had the impression from reading Anthony that he was suggesting the Yamnaya were capable of mounting actual armed cavalry operations. But it isn't hard to imagine that armed warriors, skilled enough in horse control to manage herds, might have also used them for getting to a location for a quick raid and then escaping on them afterwards. People on foot would have difficulty catching up with raiders who could get away on horses even if for a short distance with relative primitive means of controlling the animals. In fact, this would have been such a valuable advantage that it is hard to imagine someone would not have developed the tactic at a relative early date. One might further conjecture that actual cavalry tactics might have developed later as a means of defending against such predation.
Stanley Shannon
Stanley Shannon 3 ай бұрын
@TigerWoodsLibido It would be a thousand years before anyone was conquering anyone from the back of a horse.
TigerWoodsLibido
TigerWoodsLibido 3 ай бұрын
The Botai taught them and they merged, cementing the Proto Indo European language and their technology conquered the earth.
oduffy1936
oduffy1936 Жыл бұрын
@Dan Davis History I don't think Mr. Shannon was suggesting large scale cavalry operations; but rather small scale raids, perhaps along the lines of the Táin Bó Cúailnge from Irish myth? Cattle raids are a feature of all nomadic/pastoral peoples, with or without horse (or camel) riding. Ten guys riding bareback without horse bits, arrive to the camp of whomever they're raiding. Get off the horses, steal whatever they're stealing, and get back on the horses to escape. Raiding, for pastoral peoples, is what passed for warfare for thousands of years.
Stanley Shannon
Stanley Shannon Жыл бұрын
@Dan Davis History It is interesting to speculate if improved horsemanship might have played a role in the Bronze Age collapse. More effective mounted forces would have played havoc on the long trade routes that had developed up to that time. And that could be why the Iron age saw the growing use of horses as a military asset.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
No Anthony specifically argues against armed cavalry invasions, he says that is a feature of the Iron Age but he does talk about mounted raiders.
The_Petrovich
The_Petrovich Жыл бұрын
When we speak about the invention of gunpowder, one of the arguments against its convergent invention in Europe and China is that it appears in European historical record alongside basic firearms. While Mesopotamia might have left first concrete evidence of horses being ridden, wouldn't there then have been a period when horses were used for other purposes there, like gunpowder was used for medicine and later fireworks in China, before it was used for weaponry?
Jack O'Neill
Jack O'Neill Жыл бұрын
cogent
Marc Belisle
Marc Belisle Жыл бұрын
Great, thought-provoking video. I think it's possible to reconcile the two theories. Maybe bareback horse riding (that doesn't leave a lot of evidence) developed in the earlier period but was only useful to relatively small numbers of steppe people traveling long distances with herds. Beyond the steppes, owning a horse was a sign of nobility among urban populations that didn't grow up alongside horses on vast plains and didn't have the same level of comfort and intuitive understanding of handling horses. So chariot warfare was both easier to learn and a more recognizable sign of wealth and prestige in more urban populations of antiquity, and also more of an overwhelming combat advantage that only nobility could afford. The later developments of the saddle, and then the stirrup, made horse-riding more practical than charioteering, and thus mounted warriors replaced replaced chariots. Bigger, stronger warhorses were bred and sold in larger numbers further afield.
Juan Carlos
Juan Carlos 11 ай бұрын
Thank you Marc
Brian Boru
Brian Boru Жыл бұрын
Even if they weren't riding them into battle, I could easily see a band using them to get from point a to point b, then dismount to fight. Like Dragoons originally did during the 16th and early 17th centuries. Being able to move quickly on a horse from your camp to a fight had to be valuable in of itself or just lash the loot or supplies to the horse as you move along. Even if a cavalry charge wasn't a thing. I could easily see horses and horse riding being a valuable aspect of warfare during the Indo-European migration.
Brian Garrow
Brian Garrow Жыл бұрын
Great topic! Always fascinated with how our ancestors lived. I appreciate your use of photos of the covers of the books you referenced. It gives me a subtle motivation to consider buying the books you have used.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Thanks, glad you liked it.
DishDash
DishDash Жыл бұрын
Thanks for your work, I have really enjoyed the series, the early Steppe riders make sense to me, the length of time spent with horses and I reckon curiosity would do the rest
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Glad you enjoyed it.
April Fool
April Fool Жыл бұрын
Very interesting video, thank you for it I'm firmly on the early riding hypothesis: you can ride a horse without nearly anything at all, especially if as other people mentioned you grew up with it Other thing is I grew up on the farm and I tried to ride any animal we ever had (out of curiosity) - and while adults wouldn't probably do it, I'm sure some of Neolithic kids would have a go: you're just curious and adventurous as a kid. How on Earth do you llive among horses for thousands of years and never try to ride one? Ridiculous.....
LiamE69
LiamE69 Жыл бұрын
I think horses would have been ridden to take men to war long before they were used in the battles themselves. The former is far simpler than the latter yet still provides significant military advantage in both mobility of forces and a relative lack of fatigue from travel. In raiding it adds the ability to take more booty after the fighting is done.
somniumisdreaming
somniumisdreaming Жыл бұрын
Many Anglo Saxons in Britain seemed to take the horses to battle, dismount and then fight. Great observation.
Heimdallr
Heimdallr Жыл бұрын
To this day, in my native dialect of Croatia we still call livestock of all kind "blago" which in literal sense means treasure/wealth. As such, a man blessed with livestock/horses is blessed in wealth indeed. This most of all regards to bovines and horses.
Heimdallr
Heimdallr Жыл бұрын
@Alpa Chino That is such a great piece of information ! And it makes complete sense :) Likewise, we in my dialect we say "daž" for rain, a word directly coming from "Dažbog" (or vice versa) which means: 'gift' and 'god of gifts' respectively. Altho it is unknown what word was first in the sense that it was maybe the deity which got the name from the meaning of word gift, or the word gift coming from the name of the deity.
reuireuiop0
reuireuiop0 Жыл бұрын
@oduffy1936 Yup, the Dutch word vee still means all types of four legged farm animals (so no chickens or geese, which are called pluimvee, feathered vee) I remember the "paying cattle for your wife" lore from Africa, but in that particular story, the value of the woman was expressed in the number and breed. A strong or smart girl from noble heritage could be worth some cows, in contrast to a poor one worth only a couple of goats (tho said lore said nothing about that girls' physical beauty ..)
Alpa Chino
Alpa Chino Жыл бұрын
Wow! Blago means something good in Russian. Blagodarit' - "to thank", where darit' means "to give". So that literally means "to give cattle". I've just learned something new. Thanks 👍 P.s. I can't give you any cattle, though, as I don't own any. 😁😁😁
oduffy1936
oduffy1936 Жыл бұрын
The Anglo-Saxon word "fee" come from the word for cattle. As with most Indo-European pastoral peoples, cattle was the currency. In ancient Ireland, a man could only have a wife if he had the required number of cows, sheep, and horses; and he would pay the bride's family in a set number of cattle.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Thank you, I really appreciate that.
Safey Smith
Safey Smith 11 ай бұрын
24:53 - I’m so glad you made that point because I was thinking the same thing! I hope some of these authors you mentioned considered that too! That last author seemed to be stuck on the idea of how threatening horse riders were supposed to be(?) when I’m pretty sure the first point of riding them, was for the mobility.
Mar Gon
Mar Gon Жыл бұрын
One of the most important “steps” for human progress was the “taming” of the horse ! The horse then became the biggest helper of men, for everything !
Dirk Starbuck
Dirk Starbuck Жыл бұрын
Love this stuff! Love this channel! 4,000 BC was such an amazing time historically. Horses, metal, protowriting. Thanks for bringing it to life!
Jack Myers
Jack Myers 10 ай бұрын
Another excellent video! This vid made me think about James Burke’s “Connections” when he talked about how the “stirrup” changed horse mounted warfare drastically. As an innovation it was a turning point that made shock war on horseback even more effective.
Amanda Samuels
Amanda Samuels Жыл бұрын
I enjoyed your video. To me it seems likely that riding for transport came earlier (helps explain the vast geographical expansion of the Indo Europeans) but the riding for warfare came later with chariot riding coming first. What interests me is the analogous role of donkey domestication which occurred in Africa and I believe explains the spread of the Northern Afroasiatic languages in North Africa and the Fertile Crescent. Donkey domestication facilitated long distance trade and allowed for the development of pastoralism in semi arid areas. Equids have played an amazing role in human history.
J A
J A Жыл бұрын
I had a horse that I trained so well without bridal or saddle and Road bareback and the horse took my cues it is very possible that they were able to communicate to the horse the horse being extremely social and very quick Learners and with big heart and wanting to please it is very possible that Rider and horse we're able to communicate without tools and without artificial AIDS
aaron healy
aaron healy Жыл бұрын
Hi Dan, are any of your works available in audiobook format? Thanks for the great content :)
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Hello yes I have books from both my fantasy series on audiobook with more being released soon. There are links in the description to Amazon where you can get the audio and here are links to Audible. UK Audible: www.audible.co.uk/author/Dan-Davis/B00QHGACE0 US Audible: www.audible.com/author/Dan-Davis/B00QHGACE0
Jennifer Brien
Jennifer Brien Жыл бұрын
I imagine the early horse-eaters used them somewhat as the Suomi use reindeer. Riding, if it happened at all, would be of minor importance, and I can't see it happening at all until well after mares were first milked. Possibly horses were first used as pack animals, or to pull a travois. The early Irish used to hitch horses to the plough by tying it to their tail. The Mesopotamian horse racing looks remarkably like a donkey derby, and that is still the most popular way to ride a donkey bareback. A proper saddle, even a Roman style one with no stirrups, makes a great difference in speed for either horse or donkey.
gerald takala
gerald takala Жыл бұрын
You mean Saami, Suomi means Finland
James Mungo
James Mungo Жыл бұрын
@T The book says tying it to tail prevents the plough from breaking as the pain of hitting a rock stops the horse, also the breed of local horse was apparently adapted to this and ugly.
mondopinion
mondopinion Жыл бұрын
That is a great observation about parallels with the Saami use of reindeer. But those antlers on the reindeer would be a game changer.
T
T Жыл бұрын
@out in the sticks basic Mouldboard ploughs were present in late Roman/early medieval periods. But an ard pulled by a horses tail or a wife is going to have very limited effectiveness, unless in the lightest soil. Medieval and early modern plows were usually pulled by Oxen.
T
T Жыл бұрын
@out in the sticks that must have been such a pain, imagine lassoing a steer then turning and leaning over your horses rump to try and tie it to the horses tail, while the steer pulls on the rope! It doesn't sound very practical at all. The Spanish had saddles developed from Knights jousting/fighting saddles which had the saddle trees extending high either side of them, and they used these wooden protusions to take a turn on their rope before they were refined into saddle horns.
Amie Vaughan
Amie Vaughan Жыл бұрын
I think you make a good case for how slowly and organically domestication and riding evolved. Getting a foal used to people weight is an example of how it could have come about. A small person leans on the foal, as it grows more and more weight is used. Little kids can be put on at this point. Light weight adolescents can get on as the foal gets bigger. It is like dog domestication with children and young adults taking a needed role. What kid doesn't want to play with baby animals?
William Mashtalier
William Mashtalier Жыл бұрын
Another great video! I do think early horse riding existed but for transport, it seems to me that the chariot was the development that first made horses feasible for battle, but who is to say you couldn't ride in and dismount to fight. Sort of like a bronze age dragoon. Again love these videos, can hardly wait to see the next one.
dustyfun
dustyfun Жыл бұрын
Thanks for showcasing both theories and describing them further. I have to admit that man learning to ride only in the first millenium B.C. seems rather late to me. On the other hand, when there exist early depictions of charriots, why do not exist simultanous depictions or descriptions of mounted men? So although it is hard to believe, i'd believe in late riders unless there is more convincing proof for riding in earlier times.
Horseman Oz
Horseman Oz Жыл бұрын
Wow, thank you. Some amazing information here and in the comments below. I'm sure this debate will go on for a long time but, meanwhile.. I can enjoy the mystery, almost as much as I enjoy the horses themselves.
Tser
Tser 3 ай бұрын
From my equestrian professional background, when I saw Mesopotamian riding depictions I definitely agree it looks like "extreme sport" type riding, like a rodeo, or perhaps something akin to Minoan bull leaping. There's a surcingle depicted around the anatomical girth of one of the horses in those images. Those are used in modern sports for both bronc riding and also a sport that involves jumping onto a moving horse's back from the ground, vaulting. As you said it looks like a bad idea... unless you're into that, ahaha. The same reason people do bronc busting and bull riding today, to show off how badass they are. The riding position is what makes it feel sketchy to me, rather than the tack. There have been a lot of ways of controlling horses throughout history, not just bits, but riding the horse's butt or way up on the neck is not a stable position (and not good for the longevity of the horse either). The butt is going to bump you around, the neck means you go right over the front if the horse stops or swerves... just all in all a wild time. I'm inclined to go with the late theory in terms of riding in a way that would've made war mounts possible (and, I expect, after a long period of practical use of riding horses but not with the kind of skill and finesse to turn it into a battle strategy). It seems like that would be such a big deal, so lifechanging, that if people were riding with the finesse and skill to wage war from horseback, we'd find at least SOME art of it. But maybe I just romanticize the horse, haha. That said, I also feel that the oldest kinds of tack probably wouldn't have left archeological evidence except in rare, ideal conditions, like thong bridles (leather looped through the mouth around the bottom jaw of the horse). I doubt that they would've left the dental evidence that Olsen's team looked for. Thong bridles are used into modern times, and many cultures came up with them independently so it's not a stretch, in my opinion, that they were used in early horse riding. There are bitless bridles with no metal in them also used frequently into modern times, which some cultures use over metal bits when teaching young, strong, untrained animals. A hackamore has a noseband of of thick leather, rope, or rawhide (a bosal hackamore) and and gives a lot of control without any metal. Some cultures have used thin ropes that ran over the gums of the horse (which sounds awful, yikes). We know that horses were controlled with nose rings as well as bulls in ancient times. In some cultures that use water buffalo and zebu for riding and draft animals, it's common to use a rope through the piercing without a metal ring as a bridle or halter (again, yikes). We've identified deformations and damage in modern horse skulls from nose bands; I wonder if anyone's studied ancient horse skulls for that. It might be a bit subtle in most cases so might not be helpful. Just a horse person, and not an archeologist by any means, though. Absolutely fascinating to learn about!
Philipp Mattes
Philipp Mattes 11 ай бұрын
After watching this great video, I'm actually inclined to support the late riding hypothesis. If there would have existed a better way of riding than sitting on the rear of the horse and goading it with a nose-ring, then this method would - assumedly - have been copied by the other cultures (based on the assumption that the riding method depicted in Mesopotamia is "appaling" and rahter difficult as mentioned in the video). If such complex innovations like metallurgy found their way to other cultures rahter quickly, then why would a technique (and advantage) like "proper" riding be restricted to the western steppes while the neighbouring cultures would have been bound to use tricks like sitting far to the back of the horse and trying to steer it with a nose-ring?
Charles Walker
Charles Walker Жыл бұрын
Interesting, great in - depth study...my uncle had this as a future project...included the famous riders of future rulers..
Philippe Courtheuse
Philippe Courtheuse Жыл бұрын
I have been riding horses for over 50 years , I have een a jockey and broke in lots of horses and I agree with many of you , a horse has to learn how to be riding , and the bit is completly uselesss the fist month or so , and the saddle is not a most . the fact is that you don´t all this to teach a horse to be riden , he has to game trust in you to let you progressively sit on them
Amazing Amazigh
Amazing Amazigh 6 ай бұрын
Please try again in English!
John Hamilton
John Hamilton Жыл бұрын
Love this!! Very well presented. Will try your other programmes, Thank you.
Signe of Horses
Signe of Horses Жыл бұрын
Very interesting.. I (as a rider) can imagine sitting on a horse once you meet them. But then again I’m living a couple millennia later and my brain is wired differently. Still there is a huuuuhe difference between riding a horse into war and sitting on a horse moving with a herd persuading them to go into a certain direction. The latter I feel as highly likely as we see people moving with a herd and following them. Modern humans are very much about controlling things, being in control. Where I feel (not a historian) in times people were very much moving with animals, weather, landscape, seasons instead of trying to shape them to their needs. They simply shaped their needs to fit the flow of nature. Also I am curious about riding horses not being visible.. apart from bit marks on teeth.. it should show on bones. There are studies now that show what riding does to a horse and how not leaves significant signs on bones. Now there might not be enough material left of ancient horses… but there could be signs on vertebrae , elbow and shoulder bones. I’m expanding my reading list for sure. Thank you very much for this video
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Thank you. Yes the first place they would like to look is the spines - however while 6000 year old horse teeth, skulls, and long bones do survive, ancient horse vertebrae do not. They become spongy, brittle, crumbly etc and the researchers are unable to deduce anything from them. The horse experts are referenced in Drews' and Anthony's books but one who did a lot of work from the 90s until recently was Marsha Levine. She travelled all over the world to examine people's relationship with horses in all different cultures. She used this and other work to look at early horse riding on the steppe and elsewhere. She has some research papers and academic books that you may be able to track down. One of the points these people make is that the ancient wild horses are not the same animals that we have now. Not just physically but behaviourally. Our feral horse populations like mustangs seem to have slightly different social behaviours than przewalski's horses for example. Our horses now have had perhaps 6000 years of selective breeding to change them into animals that are ready to be tamed. And as you say we today understand what's possible as far as control is concerned. We have the benefit of the experience of all those generations that came before us. And yes I think most people agree that there must surely have been some sort of riding very early on - just knowing what people are like. We jump on the back of everything, given half the chance. The question is really a matter of degree. How useful and impactful was early riding? It's a fascinating question.
Perplexed Papa
Perplexed Papa Жыл бұрын
Great video! You nailed it again! Fascinating! Now you have me wondering when and where trade with our other domesticated animals started. Thank you!
craig ovenden
craig ovenden Жыл бұрын
Thanks for a great video and for having the humility to present the various theories in as fair a way as is possible, and without pretending to know things that probably nobody knows for sure.
Sparky
Sparky Жыл бұрын
As a horseman for 50 years, I can say, that hardware isn't needed to ride or control a horse. Saddles, reins, bits, stirrups, spurs, shoes, etc were developed over the centuries to expand and enhance the horse's use. I think, that the best theory is, because prehistoric Humans likely goofed around as much or more as us "civilized" descendants, horseback riding began as a "Hey. Watch this" exercise by some guy goofing around with his buddies and riding a horse "piggyback", as if they were a child on their father's shoulders. Then his buddies, competitive as guys are, when it comes to goofing around, tried to one up eachother, and see who could ride the longer distance without falling off, etc.
目は心の鏡
目は心の鏡 6 ай бұрын
I never knew horses lived through the ice age that’s crazy. i thought they were a more recent species or whatever. I always learn so much from your videos I need to watch more of them!
56Seeker
56Seeker Жыл бұрын
Fascinating video, although the music's a bit loud in places. One aspect I think could do with more weight is the development of the horse in and of it's self. Generally, the beasts depicted drawing chariots in Assyrian and Egypten friezes are called "equines", rather than horses. They're smaller, for one thing. It took as long to breed the riding horse as it did the dairy cow or the beef steer. Again, this is one of the causes of chariots, a horse can pull much more than it can carry. A war chariot drawn by two shaggy ponies too small to ride is still a battle platform capable of some 30 kph. Additionally, not all horse cultures use a bit. Native Americans in particular were known for hackamore type bridles (lack of native metal and metal workers....).. The modern riding horse is huge, the modern draught horse a freakish giant - and they're both _modern_. . and require substantial infrastructure.. Shire horses and the like are highly developed and specialised agricultural products - the feed bill alone is enormous; and only exist post 1700
Floris Brieffies
Floris Brieffies Жыл бұрын
In the Dutch language, people have ‘benen’ (legs), and a ‘hoofd’ (head), and animals have poten (legs) and a kop (head), except for the horse. Horses also have ‘benen’ and a ‘hoofd’ in the Dutch language, like people. This is a good example of the horse as a 'noble' animal.
Derrick Bonsell
Derrick Bonsell Жыл бұрын
Interestingly I first read a version of Drews's hypothesis in the late John Keegan's book A History of Warfare, which predates Robert Drews's book by quite a few years, however John Keegan of course was not a specialist and must have been referencing the mainstream view at the time. I imagine it's true at least as far as combat goes, we just don't see men fighting from horseback before the 8th century as Dr. Drews points out. I don't think it's impossible people fought on horses during skirmishes but in pitched combat I don't see any problem assuming chariotry came first.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Keegan is great. I have a feeling Drews mentions Keegan in his book when reviewing the previous literature on the subject.
Robustus
Robustus Жыл бұрын
You don’t go from raising food animals and then all of a sudden jump on their backs and start fighting like Scythians. It takes a lot of innovation and honing the art of fighting on horseback. Also even if you could effectively raise horses for food and move them as nomads do without riding some of them, focusing on them to the extent that they did over more productive breeders like cattle, sheep and goats makes very little sense. As hoofed animals go, horses and asses do not breed as quickly as animals with cloven hooves and the ability to ruminate (more efficient digestive system that gives more nutrition from food). This is the very reason why there are far fewer species of equines in the wild as there are artiodactyls (hoofed animals with an even number of toes on each foot). Focusing on horse breeding had to give a benefit other than just food. You can do more with a mount than any ox strapped to a cart, like intensive herding and mounted hunting/fighting/escaping the folks that you’re raiding.
Deep Trout
Deep Trout Жыл бұрын
The native Americans did.
mk14m0
mk14m0 Жыл бұрын
If an early (Neolithic or Bronze Age) culture had a viable cavalry tradition, it begs the question of why chariots were developed. We see chariots falling out of use when cavalry becomes viable. It’s hard to imagine chariots coming into use after an earlier pre-existing cavalry tradition. So, while horses might have been ridden with various techniques before the development of the chariot, it seems unlikely that those early riding techniques (if they existed) had any substantial military value.
Robin Hylands
Robin Hylands Жыл бұрын
Another fantastic video! I wonder if there is any evidence of horse riding related injuries in the fossil record, and whether that is distinguishable from other kinds of injuries one may face at the time. Maybe wrist and forearm fractures? Is there even a noticeable increase or presence of these injuries from times and places where we KNOW for sure that people rode horses often, versus those where we know they didn't?
Teiwo
Teiwo Жыл бұрын
"Numidian horsemen rode without saddles or bridles, controlling their mounts with a simple rope around their horse's neck and a small riding stick. They had no form of bodily protection except for a round leather shield or a leopard skin, and their main weapon were javelins in addition to a short sword." (Wikipedia) So the technology needed to be effective mounted warriors would certainly have been available to neolithic horse herders. Whether the horses were capable of being used in the style of the numidians is another question and just because something was possible doesn't mean people actually did it, but it seems a lot more likely that early horsemen would have fought primarily with javelins than as shock troops with battleaxes.
Teiwo
Teiwo 3 ай бұрын
@Clifford Jensen artwork from the period shows them carrying a bundle of spare javelins in their off hand. A waterskin could have been slung over their shoulder if they needed it.
Clifford Jensen
Clifford Jensen 3 ай бұрын
It appears that the Numidian Horsemen were superb. The Roman Cavalry could neither chase them off or close with them to engage. They probably had some sort of gear on their mounts to carry javelins and water/wine bottles at the very least.
Jacob Shell
Jacob Shell Жыл бұрын
Ukraine or the Sredny Stog cultural area in ancient times was probably swampy in addition to being steppe-like. Unlike the central and eastern steppes, the western steppes had many rivers traversing it, and the remnants of a major swamp region still exists along the Ukraine-Belarus border; likely this swamp was much bigger in ancient times. Is it possible that a swampy environment triggered horse domestication somehow? You might be a bit more willing to climb onto a horse for the first time if it was wading in the water, so falling off happens with a splash rather than a thud. And for certain river corridors, fording with horses would be the ideal way of getting across, more so than with boats.
Irena Dmytryk
Irena Dmytryk Жыл бұрын
That makes sense.
marc torrades
marc torrades Жыл бұрын
Fair play, it must have took a long time to do this , I never expected to be like that . Really enjoyable Number 1 for me . I'm not specifically horse minded, more of a cattle man , myself. I'm afraid of them. But I can see with out of them we would have done so well. Thank you.
Dogmatic Pyrrhonist
Dogmatic Pyrrhonist Жыл бұрын
It would seem to me, it's a bit of both. I highly doubt cavalry being effective in the way people imagine early on. Drews' argument about the development of cavalry is hard to argue on that, as true mounted warfare was demonstrably developed after chariot warfare. And it seems unlikely it would have been forgotten and needed re-discovering. But it also seems unlikely there was no riding. Or non-war carts tied to horses. I suspect horses, even early on, enhanced mobility a lot. And that that affected warfare, but maybe not the way us modern people think of it after the several waves of step sourced horse culture invasions of just about everywhere. But if your military force can get to key points, dismount, and fight, that's still a military advantage. And it's an even bigger cultural/trade advantage.
Imperator lightoneous
Imperator lightoneous 11 ай бұрын
Just came upon your channel this morning and, im definitely impressed! Fantastic content
john johnson
john johnson Жыл бұрын
Great video. I like how you present different beliefs, include references, and state your opinion, but leave it open for the viewer to form their own opinion if they want to. Too many scientists get stuck on owning hypotheses to glorify themselves, rather than using hypotheses dispassionately as points to confirm or refute in an objective logical pursuit of the truth. Very nice.
john johnson
john johnson Жыл бұрын
@Dan Davis History Yeah, me either :) Too often "expert" is not a compliment. I know you didn't mean it that way but that is my own experience. "Lancet Editor: Half Of Science Is Wrong." wmbriggs.com/post/16092/
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Thank you, appreciate it. I really wouldn't want anyone to mistake me for an expert on any of this stuff.
Everett Brown
Everett Brown Жыл бұрын
Bless this man and all his links in the description. I've been looking for great maps of pre-historic migrations.
andrew strongman
andrew strongman Жыл бұрын
Have you read Arthur Cotterell's book "Chariot: The astounding rise and fall of the world's first war machine"? There is a lot in there that few people know about, such as the ancient Chinese also using chariots for hundreds of years during and after their Spring and Autumn period of wars (770-481 BC). Chariots had not dominated Middle-Eastern battlefields for hundreds of years at that point. Mostly due to foot-archers and infantry 'runners'.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
I actually own that book Andrew but haven't read it yet. I have read about the development of the chariot in the Sintashta culture and its spread in other books and am looking forward to Cotterell's one too.
Misreading The River
Misreading The River Жыл бұрын
Like so many other commenters, I grew up around horses. We rode bareback as kids. I was never that great, but two of my friends were amazing. And one of my friends horses could have been riden bareback by anyone, it was just smart and gentle. Perfectly happy to have a couple kids jumping up and down on it, and just seemed to know what you wanted to do. Some of the others would immediately try to get rid of you, but yeah, for a horse culture people to have horses gentle enough to harness to a wagon, but not be riding them in some way shape or form, I don't buy it.
Ruairi Martin
Ruairi Martin Жыл бұрын
Personally I think that the early steppe peoples would have used horses to move to and from raids rather than fight from horse back, I remember reading that naitive american tribes when they first got the horse did a similar thing before they got the hang of fighting from horse back
Sandra Kleinschmit
Sandra Kleinschmit Жыл бұрын
@oduffy1936 His comment was this,in part:: "Personally I think that the early steppe peoples would have used horses to move to and from raids rather than fight from horse back." The part about the Native Americans is the part that was much later than what I was saying. I was also simply adding to his comment,not attempting to refute it.
oduffy1936
oduffy1936 Жыл бұрын
@Sandra Kleinschmit But that's thousands of years later, from the time horses were domesticated, which I think is the author's point.
Sandra Kleinschmit
Sandra Kleinschmit Жыл бұрын
Ancient Mongolians used horses to fight with. They used bows and arows to fight while riding them.They were famous for doing so. As a matter of fact,one of the most famous Horse people were the Scythians.
Walton Smith
Walton Smith Жыл бұрын
Yeah their mobility would still convey and advantage even if the warriors dismounted before battle.
Nancy Borden
Nancy Borden Жыл бұрын
I know nothing about this subject but find horses and info about them fascinating. I tend to agree with the comment about using what would be essentially a bitless halter on early horses. Just seems like a natural place to start and the bit came much later.
martin warner
martin warner Жыл бұрын
What a brilliant video Sir. Do not much like horses, but now I see the picture of their impact on humans. Thank you.
L Hurst
L Hurst Жыл бұрын
What amazes me is how long it tool to develop stirrups. Horses were rode for thousands of years before this invention, truly astounding if you have ever ridden a horse.
Melissa Montilla
Melissa Montilla Жыл бұрын
I have a horse who was a wild stallion. I ride with no bit and trained him initially without a saddle. My daughter jumps him bareback and bridleless. The bit is meant to be communication tool, not a control mechanism. It informs the head and shoulders while the legs inform the barrel and hind end.
Adrea Brooks
Adrea Brooks Жыл бұрын
Excellent work! Highly informative and concisely presented. For the record, I'd be fascinated to watch athat "History of the Chariot" video you mentioned in passing. :)
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Thank you. Yes we will have to do that for sure.
Paul Matolsy
Paul Matolsy Жыл бұрын
Nice job, Dan Davis! Just discovered your channel. Impressive presentation. Keep up the good work. Have to read your books.
Dan Davis History
Dan Davis History Жыл бұрын
Awesome, glad you found the channel. I hope you enjoy my stories.
Deirdre Gibbons
Deirdre Gibbons 5 ай бұрын
I enjoyed this very much. I loved you showed footage of Icelandic horses so much. This is a very old breed that may possibly be related to the equally ancient steppe horse breed used in Mongolia in Genghis Khan's time through the 21st century. Icelandic horses' body type is quite similar to the cave paintings of early equines. Icelandic horses are small but also very powerful and energetic. They also are good natured to people they trust. I could see why our ancesters would admire horses like this. Icelandic horses were used in warfare, but they were equally as important for herding, transportation and carrying loads. They are still considered very special to Iceland's history and culture. On another tangent, Drewe's view that horses don't need bridles and saddles to be ridden has an interesting historical precedent. The Numidian cavalry used in Carthagian and later in Roman military did not use saddles or bridles. They rode bareback and controlled their horses with a rope around the horse's neck and a stick they would use to tell the horse which direction to turn.
Niche Games
Niche Games Жыл бұрын
I like how you laid this out. I'd guess that once a horse was semi-domesticated some knucklehead jump on the back and rode it, that is just human nature, as for anything more sophisticated than that we'd need some evidence.
Space Canuk
Space Canuk Жыл бұрын
Even just mounted infantry would have been a huge military advantage, especially for raiders. I know we Danes would often steal those first when we landed in the viking times and do rapid reconnaissance. Plus it makes going after vulnerable targets easier since you can find them quickly, hit hard and leave just as fast with more stuff than if you're moving just on foot.
Ang H
Ang H Жыл бұрын
This is a brilliant upload. Thank you Dan Davis - Author.
Carl Jacobson
Carl Jacobson Жыл бұрын
I think that the early domestication of the horse is more likely, considering that it spread so far across the Central Asian Plains to the the Far East of Asia. and that Hunnic Horsemen were already interacting and fighting with Ancient Chinese Cultures at the end of the 1st Millenium BC. I have a hard time believing that the ancient Mongols and Turks had 'Mastered' the Horse in only a couple hundred years.
Carl Lelandt
Carl Lelandt Жыл бұрын
The first horsemen were the kids that raised the little foal, with the help of several of the old tribe elders. They played with it, used it to help them gather firewood and other items.. As the colt grew, and several of the youngsters managed to learn to ride it, the young horse and rider began scouting for the tribe, accomplishing in hours, what would otherwise have taken days. Thus the value of the young horse and rider was understood beyond question. Similarly, paleo kids were probably the first to use flattened frozen hides/skins as play to slide down snowy slopes and hills.. Huge fun and learning experience.
equarg
equarg Жыл бұрын
I can see early man killing a mare…..and the scared foal hung around. Plus, it smelled its mom on them. While old enough to eat grass, it was still attached to mom. So it follows the hunters home because the rest of the herd is long gone. Initially confused, the hunters laugh this off as a snack following it home. Making for a easy kill later on. Well, the foal hangs around, at out of loneness decides to hang around a younger non aggressive human for companionship. This human child may be the kid of a high ranking clan member, so the parent tells the other hunters to leave the foal be for now, since it makes his kid happy. Well, you know kids. They love climbing on things. Ever see them with a dog? After a few months, the kid and foal get really attached. The foal grows, and the kid likes the crawl on it. The now older horse is kind of a quiet omega animal, so it decides it’s better to put up with these scary humans, then being alone. Plus, one human feeds it treats sometimes and keeps nasty predators away. Well, one day, the kid fully sits on the young horses back. Horse crow hops a few times, turns its head, sniffs, and decides to just keep grazing. Kid is initially just thrilled with that. But seeing the horse move around, and even run he starts to get an idea. He teaches the horse how to respond to a rope(pressure) on the ground (so it won’t wonder off either). He fashions a crude halter, gets on its back, and applies pressure with the halter and legs for the young horse to move. Horse, initially startled, decides to do what the “alpha” is telling it do do. After some trial and error, he is able to ride around, maybe even putting a leather thong around the neck, or a crude blanket on the horses back for grip. This definitely got the tribes attention, and the young ladies swooning at the sight. This of course gets the other guys attention. They want to impress the ladies too. Perhaps they catch other young horses after a hunt and try to copy the first guy. A few succeed and other uses for horses for hunting , travel, warfare, scouting, and packing goods is quickly discovered. I am convinced a young man or kid was the first to get on a horses back, and impressed the adults.
Ted Archer
Ted Archer Жыл бұрын
Ancient riders probably rode on the back side of the horse because horses spine wasn't adapted to heavy loads in the middle. Even modern horses have a lot of spine problems, even with modern saddles
myparcel tape
myparcel tape Жыл бұрын
Oddly, today I heard a radio report that (among other things) said that the genetics of the modern horse gives them a stronger spine than the horse types which are now extinct.
DeathToCringe
DeathToCringe 10 ай бұрын
I've seen bone/antler mouth pieces in functional positions in bronze age (middle probably, not my field of expertise) paired horse burials in my part of Eastern Europe. Also the archaeozoologist on that site told us that, after consulting with veterinarians, there is a bone in the horse's foot that over-develops when it is ridden. So all our horses were not ridden but they were used due to their mouth pieces. So I tend to believe that they were using them on chariots.
Benthicc Biomancer
Benthicc Biomancer Жыл бұрын
I think I take something of a middling position in terms of the Yamnaya riding horses into Europe: using horses in warfare =/= fighting your opponents from horseback. I agree with Drews that some random steppe herder on horseback wouldn't be a particularly big combat multiplier for them in a face-to-face fight. But I wouldn't discount the value of mobility when it comes to the type of warfare that would have been happening in the EBA. The Yamnaya probably used horses much as early modern dragoons, ride up to the fight before dismounting to do the fighting. And keep in mind that there would have been little in the way of 'pitched battles' during the centuries long, decentralized movement into Europe. Most 'warfare' would have consisted of endemic skirmishing and cattle rustling. Where that sort of 'dragoon' fighting style would have been a massive combat multiplier, without a single herder having to ever needing swing an axe from horseback.
Michael Pierce
Michael Pierce Жыл бұрын
I also had a fleeting thought about the possibility of the "runners" associated with chariot fighting being the first to really realize that the chariot was optional. During these chariot fights there would be runners who's task it would be to drag charioteers off their chariots once they were wounded and finish the job. I wonder if some of these runners figured that jumping directly on the back of the horses and controlling the chariot from ahead was more effective.
Michael Pierce
Michael Pierce Жыл бұрын
Looks like the author of the paper "Berserks: A History of Indo-European "Mad Warriors" , Michael Speidal, does in fact cite one of Drews books when talking about these runners. Citing End of the Bronze Age by Drews (135 - 163). The purpose was to draw a connection to specific infantry role such as the runners to beserk style disregard for safety.
barkershill
barkershill 4 ай бұрын
Dan, speaking as a farmer I can tell you that it is standard practice with both sheep and cattle breeding too keep one male for approximately forty females , it’s all you need for reproduction extra males are just superfluous and extra mouths to feed , so presumably the same principle held true for horses . Love, your channel Btw
Dragoş Scarlat
Dragoş Scarlat Жыл бұрын
I would like to make a commentary regarding minute 19:28 , the person depicted there probably was sitting back on the horse because the horse wasnt tamed yet or it was very difficult to be controled thus, the rider would avoid being thrown by the horse while kicking. I saw techniques like this here in Romania in country-side. The same thing applies to donkeys. I loved this video so much! I tend to agree with Drews because it sounds more anchorated in reality, for me, although I dont agree horses werent riden until the collapse of Bronze Age. It's very difficult to work with very little proofs.
Hank de Wit
Hank de Wit Жыл бұрын
Hi Dan. I'm enjoying your series. Its commonly thought that the centaur myth was created by the Greeks as a result of an initial encounter with horse riding warriors. If horse riding was pre-Bronze Age wouldn't they have been completely familiar with it. But if the horse riders appeared shortly before or around the Bronze Age collapse it would be more likely that it would survive into the early Iron Age as a Greek myth. Just a guess.
Rara Avis
Rara Avis Жыл бұрын
Very interesting video. Personally, I'm with the 'they tried to climb on those horses as soon as they had the chance' people. Because that's just what human beings do. Or some of them, anyway . Maybe for fun or as a dare among boys at first...but they would soon have realised, how immensely useful ridden scouts and hunters were.
Postictal
Postictal Жыл бұрын
Everyone loves an animal story. Perhaps dog domestication would be a good topic. Also, taking another example of Native American fighting style, the Apache are great dragoons. They rode up to battle and then fought on foot.
Emu Overlord
Emu Overlord Жыл бұрын
@dbmail545 I think a 14,000 year old dog skeleton that was recently found showed signs of domestication, which is pretty cool
Will Bass
Will Bass Жыл бұрын
Comanches fought on horseback.
dbmail545
dbmail545 Жыл бұрын
That's certainly mired in controversy. Almost the only thing known about early dog domestication is the 13,000 yo bone knife that appears to show a collared wolf like animal carved into its grip.
Death
Death Жыл бұрын
Horses are indeed beautiful animals. Thank you for this upload, you've got yourself a new subscriber. Cheers!
Seahorse 56
Seahorse 56 Жыл бұрын
Just came across your channel today. Excellent content! Looking forward to checking out some of your fiction as well.
Demoncore
Demoncore Жыл бұрын
If we think of chariots first, we do think of horses in actual combat. What about mounted infantry first? Simply being able to move quicker is a massive advantage on it's own.
Celebrimbor
Celebrimbor Жыл бұрын
What an excellent video. I like to think that madmen used to try and ride them as soon as they were prey. But when this became viable, who knows.
Lynn Seguin
Lynn Seguin Жыл бұрын
This is fascinating. Came across it while looking for information on medieval jousting. I didn't realize that the practice of riding horses can be traced back to about 2 or 3 thousand years ago. That's practically a recent development.
Correctpolitically
Correctpolitically 25 күн бұрын
Faster travel means more communication and faster advancement.
Lynn Seguin
Lynn Seguin Жыл бұрын
Shared at Westeros.org along with video Army of the Dead
Jacob Ironside
Jacob Ironside Жыл бұрын
Your channel reminds me of the history channel when they still had history on it. great video!
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